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Old school methods win Murrells Inlet Tournament

June 17, 2017 Live Great Outdoors Blog Comments Off on Old school methods win Murrells Inlet Tournament


Coleman Bess, Shaun Bess and Haslin Rogers celebrate their win last Saturday in the 8th annual Murrells Inlet Rotary Flounder Tournament at Crazy Sister Marina. Contributed photo
Outdoors
June 16, 2017 5:30 PM
Bess, partners go old school, reel in Murrells Inlet Flounder tourney title
By Gregg HolshouserThe time-tested method of fishing for flounder in Murrells Inlet paid off for Shaun Bess and his two fishing partners in the 8th annual Murrells Inlet Rotary Flounder Tournament held last Saturday.
Going back decades, fishermen have been a fixture on the inlet, puttering along at a snail’s pace in small boats, slow-trolling bottom rigs with live mud minnows for bait.
That is just what Bess, his 17-year-old son Coleman, a rising senior at St. James High School, and fishing buddy Haslin Rogers did to win the tournament — along with nearly $2,000 in prize money.

The trio fished in a 15-foot McKee Craft in the one-day tournament, and went to a spot that is also proven its worth over time — the Charlie Cut area.
“It was basically a beautiful day, the tide had just started falling and we started picking up some fish,” recalled Bess. “All three of us were catching some good fish. We were just out there trolling around and sure enough I caught a good one. I just reeled him in, netted him and put him in the box.”

After measuring the fish at 22 inches on his cooler, Bess felt like they were in the running.
“I was thinking we all had a couple good fish, ‘Man, we have a chance, maybe we’ll be lucky enough to place,’” said Bess. “I really didn’t think it would win but knew it was a good fish based on prior tournaments.”
Late in the afternoon at the weigh-in at Crazy Sister Marina, the three-man crew learned their flounder weighed 3.43 pounds and was the largest caught among the 74 anglers fishing in the tournament. The $1,000 first prize for biggest flounder was theirs, in addition to winning the tournament-within-a-tournament (TWT) categories for biggest flounder and heaviest three-fish aggregate.
“It was awesome,” said Bess, owner-operator of Bess Landscaping in Murrells Inlet. “I just thought somebody would bring in a 5-plus pound fish.”
Aside from the prize money, Bess, who was sponsored in the event by Sons of Zorn, a landscape supply company, was happy to fish in and win the tournament with his two best fishing buddies.
“Haslin and I are pretty solid fishing partners,” said Bess. “We really just enjoy fishing together. We had Coleman in the boat this time. It was awesome having him out there with us.”
Jeff Heise finished second with a three-fish aggregate of 6.45 pounds. Mike Brady took third place with a 3.13-pound flounder.
David Strickland was fourth with a 2.39-pounder and Robert Hoops took fifth with a 2.31-pounder.
Bess won the TWT three-fish aggregate of 7.43 pounds and the largest flounder TWT with the 3.43-pounder.
The top Youth Angler was seven-year-old Wyatt Stiles with a 2.69-pound flounder and 11-year-old Cameron Lee was second with a 2.62-pounder.
Meatfish Slam
The 9th annual Meatfish Slam was held last weekend out of Georgetown Landing Marina after being postponed from its original dates in late April.
Capt. Todd Bruner of the charter boat Bruno, a 42-foot Bertram, and his crew won the $5,000 first-place prize with an aggregate of 63.1 pounds.
The winner was determined by the heaviest aggregate weight of the largest wahoo, dolphin and tuna caught by each participating boat, and Bruno was the only boat to weigh in all three.
The Bruno crew boated a 41.8-pound wahoo, the key to their victory, a 13-pound dolphin and an 8.3-pound tuna. The wahoo was the largest weighed in.
“The wahoo is always the kicker in this tournament,” said Ed Keelin of Georgetown Landing Marina.
The top Youth Angler was Kaylee Thomas, who caught the 41.8-pound wahoo aboard Bruno. The top Lady Angler was Madison Scimanico who caught a 15.5-pound dolphin.
Bruno also won the tournament-within-a-tournament categories for aggregate weight, Big Dog aggregate and largest wahoo. Pain Killer was second in both aggregate categories with 41.4 pounds while Georgi Girl caught the second-largest wahoo, a 23.4-pounder.
Pain Killer caught the largest dolphin, a 23.4-pounder followed by Earl E Bird with a 15.6-pounder.
Pain Killer also weighed in the largest tuna — a 17.7-pound blackfin — followed by Earl E. Bird and its catch of a 15.6-pound blackfin.
Jolly Mon Classic
A field of 250 boats was expected to fish in the Yellowfin/Yamaha Jolly Mon King Classic Saturday and Sunday out of Ocean Isle Fishing Center in Ocean Isle Beach, N.C.
Competing boats can fish one of the two days in the tournament which is the first event in the inaugural Kingfish Cup series. The tournament is not part of the Southern Kingfish Association (SKA) schedule of tournaments this year.
Other events in the Kingfish Cup are the Got ‘Em On Classic (July 7-9), the Fall Brawl King Classic (Oct. 13-15) and the Rumble in the Jungle (Oct. 20-22).

Plenty of options for local fishermen.

June 16, 2017 Live Great Outdoors Blog Comments Off on Plenty of options for local fishermen.


Fishing is being done on Pier 14 and 2nd Avenue Pier after about five or six sharks were seen in a school of fish at 63 Avenue North in Myrtle Beach on June 13. Janet Blackmon Morgan jblackmon@thesunnews.com
Outdoors
June 15, 2017 7:31 PM
Fishing report: Flounder, black drum offer anglers plenty options in local estuaries
By Gregg HolshouserEstuary
Look For: Flounder, spotted seatrout, black drum, red drum, sheepshead, bluefish.
Comments: Capt. Patrick Kelly of Captain Smiley Fishing Charters reports fishing is very good in the estuaries in the Little River area. “We’ve had some great trips the last few days,” said Kelly, who has fished the Sunset Beach, Little River Inlet and Dunn Sound areas. Kelly has caught smaller spotted seatrout on live shrimp on popping corks and used top-water lures such as Mirrolures to land larger trout. Kelly has used live shrimp on a 1/4-ounce jig head to catch black drum and flounder, and cut mullet on the same jig head to target red drum. Flounder have also been receptive to Berkeley Gulp Shrimp and Shad (pearl white). Capt. Mike McDonald of Gul-R-Boy Guide Service in Georgetown had a solid trip on Wednesday catching red drum and croaker while floating cut shrimp in Winyah Bay. McDonald noted a water temperature of 78 degrees on the trip. Capt. Jeff Maples of Reel Salty Charters has had solid success with flounder and black drum this week in Murrells Inlet.
Inshore
Look For: King mackerel, Spanish mackerel, bluefish, spadefish, flounder, black sea bass, weakfish, whiting, croaker, pompano, flounder, black drum, red drum.

Comments: Kings were very active on the mid-range bottom spots such as Belky Bear and the Jungle early this week, but catches slowed in the last few days. The slow-down is temporary though, and look for concentrations of kings in depths of 50 feet and beyond, hitting slow-trolled live bait such as menhaden or dead bait such as cigar minnows. Don’t be mistaken though, kings can be found anywhere from the beach on out where baitfish is prevalent. Maples of Reel Salty Charters has had best success on down-riggers. The near-shore bottom spots are holding spadefish, weakfish, black sea bass and flounder. “There are some good size flounder showing up,” said Maples, who caught a 3.8-pounder on Monday. There have been scattered catches of several species on Grand Strand piers including whiting, croaker, spots, blues, Spanish mackerel, flounder, pompano and the occasional black or red drum. Scott Skrzydlinski of Cherry Grove Pier reported a surface water temperature of 80 degrees with a bottom temperature of 79 late Thursday afternoon. Cobia cannot be harvested in 2017 in South Carolina waters (to three miles offshore) or federal waters (beyond three miles) and must be released.
Offshore
Look For: Dolphin, wahoo, blackfin tuna, blue marlin, white marlin, sailfish, grouper, amberjack, black sea bass, triggerfish, porgy, grunts.
Comments: As we get deeper into June, dolphin are becoming more scattered, as is expected at this time. “The dolphin are kind of sporadic,” said Ed Keelin, general manager of Georgetown Landing Marina. “If you find them you can get them good but it’s kind of spotty.” A few tuna and wahoo have accented the catches for trolling boats. “I think the wahoo and some dolphin have pushed into that shallower water,” said Keelin. “You should be be able to catch some scattered in with the kings in 90 feet of water.” Look for sailfish encounters to be on the rise. Bottom fishing is very good at present, especially in depths of 90 feet and beyond. Look for vermilion snapper, black sea bass, triggerfish, porgy, grunts, amberjack and grouper. Red snapper must be released in the South Atlantic region. Cobia cannot be harvested in 2017 in South Carolina waters (to three miles offshore) or federal waters (beyond three miles) and must be released.
Freshwater
Look For: Bream, catfish, bass, crappie.
Comments: The Little Pee Dee River has dropped to a very fishable level and the bream-fishing fanatics have taken advantage this week. The Little Pee Dee at Galivants Ferry was at 4.54 feet Thursday, and anglers have been catching limits of bream, including bluegill, warmouth and shellcracker. Look for fish in 2-4 feet of water along the banks, with most anglers floating crickets and some using worms. “The fishing’s been really good,” said Ronald Stalvey of Stalvey’s Bait and Tackle in Conway. “The Waccamaw, the Little Pee Dee, Black River, Ricefields, they’re all on fire right now.” Stalvey was actually glad – for the Little Pee Dee’s sake – to see rain in the forecast. “I’m kinda glad we’re getting the rain,” said Stalvey. “The Little Pee Dee was falling so fast it was going to dry up.” Stalvey also said catfish activity is very good with fish hitting a variety of bait including eels, black salties and goldfish

Fishing report for June 9, 2017

June 9, 2017 Live Great Outdoors Blog Comments Off on Fishing report for June 9, 2017


Dennis Anderson TNS

June 08, 2017 3:32 PM
This week’s Myrtle Beach-area fishing report
By Gregg HolshouserEstuary
Look For: Flounder, spotted seatrout, black drum, red drum, sheepshead, bluefish.
Comments: It’s been a week full of dodging rain showers for anglers fishing the bays, inlets and sounds from Georgetown to Brunswick County, N.C., with a significant cool-down the last few days. The temperatures Thursday morning were in the upper 50s, a real rarity for the second week in June, with a north-northeast wind at 15-25 mph to boot. “I’m still trying to thaw out,” said Capt. Jeff Maples of Reel Salty Charters after a Thursday morning trip in Murrells Inlet. “With the wind and moisture, that’s what was so bad.” Maples fishes the near-shore waters in the ocean when conditions permit, but on this day stayed in the inlet, caught two short flounder and then ended the trip short on request of his customers. Capt. Patrick Kelly of Captain Smiley Charters in Little River has had solid success with spotted seatrout, red drum and black drum despite the rain this week. Kelly has used cut mullet for the red drum and shrimp for the black drum. Kelly noted the water temperature had dropped to 74 as of midday Thursday. Capt. Mike McDonald of Gul-R-Boy Guide Service in Georgetown had marginal catches of red drum, spotted seatrout and black drum on Tuesday in the Winyah Bay vicinity using mud minnows, shrimp and cut menhaden for bait. McDonald noted a water temperature of 78 degrees Tuesday before the cold front arrived.
Inshore
Look For: King mackerel, Spanish mackerel, bluefish, spadefish, black sea bass, flounder, weakfish, whiting, croaker, pompano, black drum.

Comments: The windy, rainy stretch has kept most boats off the inshore waters, but the action Maples found before the front last Sunday gives an idea of what’s in store once conditions return to normal in a few days. First, Maples limited out on king mackerel and added a 4.4-pound Spanish mackerel at Belky Bear, a bottom spot about 12 miles offshore. With some time still left on the trip, Maples found jelly balls and deployed them at Paradise Reef, where his crew caught spadefish on the jelly balls plus flounder and weakfish on the bottom. Michael Wallace of Cherry Grove Pier reports anglers had a good day Wednesday in the rain catching Spanish mackerel and bluefish, including some large ones, by jigging mackerel trees and casting Gotcha plugs. Anglers fishing on the bottom at the pier have caught whiting, a few spots, small black drum and one large red drum. Wallace noted a cooler water temperature of 75 degrees on the surface and 76 on the bottom. Cobia cannot be harvested in 2017 in South Carolina waters (to three miles offshore) or federal waters (beyond three miles) and must be released.

Offshore
Look For: Dolphin, blackfin tuna, wahoo, blue marlin, sailfish, vermilion snapper, black sea bass, triggerfish, grunts, porgy, amberjack, grouper.
Comments: The rainy, stormy weather has kept most boats from venturing offshore this week, and the north wind that kicked in Thursday morning produced a gale warning. Conditions were set to improve starting Saturday, with a favorable east-southeast wind in the forecast. Dolphin are still the best bet for trolling boats, although numbers of fish caught has slowed overall of late. Blackfin tuna, wahoo, blue marlin, sailfish and barracuda are also in the trolling mix. Bottom fishing is very good for vermilion snapper, black sea bass, triggerfish, porgy, grunts, grouper and amberjack, especially in depths of 90-plus feet. Scamp are the most common grouper species being caught, with gag and red grouper also available. Red snapper cannot be harvested and must be released in the South Atlantic region. Cobia cannot be harvested in 2017 in South Carolina waters (to three miles offshore) or federal waters (beyond three miles) and must be released.
Freshwater
Look For: Bream, bass, catfish, crappie.
Comments: Despite an overload of rain from Monday through Wednesday, the river levels are still in decent shape. The Little Pee Dee at Galivants Ferry was at 6.48 feet at 1 p.m. Thursday while the Waccamaw at Conway was at 8.6 feet. Both rivers were forecast to slowly recede. “Fishing’s still great,” said Ronald “Catfish” Stalvey of Stalvey’s Bait and Tackle in Conway. One of Stalvey’s customers caught a limit of bream – bluegill with four shellcracker – on the Little Pee Dee on a rainy Wednesday. The fish were caught on worms in four feet of water. In general, look for bream in 2-4 feet of water hitting crickets and worms. “Bass have been biting good still and there’s a lot of catfish being caught,” said Stalvey